Archive for the ‘Newsletter’ Category

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congratulations to Jay Hernandez

Wednesday, September 1st, 2010

As I perused through my sites yesterday, lo and behold there I am watching a news cast with Jay talking to the camera about saving a young girl’s life by performing CPR.  What a life saver!  I give you a huge hug Jay!!

I’ve worked with Jay in the past and this doesn’t surprise me at all.  His past will never leave him!  He’s been a great EMT and a great Instructor too.  Please click on the video and headlines below, enjoy the goosebumps and by all means send him congratulations through Twitter and Facebook too!  This is what EMS personnel are all about.  You can leave the fire/EMS service but the service NEVER leaves you!!

http://www.abc-7.com/Global/story.asp?S=13076588

FORT MYERS: A maintenance worker at Brittany Apartments in Fort Myers is credited with saving two-year-old Katia Gool’s life Monday.

The toddler was not breathing when a delivery truck slammed into the back of the 1994 Ford Escort she was in.  Fort Myers Fire Department officials say the car had a flat tire in the 4000 block of Winker Avenue Extension westbound.

Jay Hernandez spent 22 years as a firefighter in Minnesota before moving to Florida.  His co-workers called him on his radio after the accident happened shortly before 4 p.m. Monday.

“(I was) trying to figure out if there was anybody I knew that could help because I know I don’t know CPR myself,” Brittany Apartments employee Stacey Gettys said. “When I saw what was going on, I was like, ‘Oh, Jay, where is he?’ ”

Hernandez hopped in his golf cart and rushed to the accident scene.

“I noticed that she wasn’t breathing and she had no pulse,” Hernandez said, recalling Katia’s condition as he arrived. “She was actually dead.”

In all, all four people in the Ford Escort were taken to Lee Memorial Hospital. 

Two adults and a six-year-old boy were treated and released, but Katia was taken to Tampa General Hospital. 

Her nurses said she is doing well after surgery and is expected to be released within the next two weeks.

Timothy Vanmeter, the driver of the delivery truck, was not injured.

“This is what it’s all about – people taking the time out of their day to help others. We really appreciate that,” Fort Myers Police Sgt. Brian O’Reilly said. “It was amazing. There was a couple of Good Samaritans that dropped what they were doing. They ran over to assist and they immediately began CPR.”

Hernandez points out a nurse was also among first on scene.  She had treated the six-year-old boy.

By Paul Gessler

Safety awareness

Wednesday, August 11th, 2010

Never stop your vehicle. 

I receive these safety messages and review to see if they are applicable to my posts.  This one really interested me!

Infant car seat on the side of the road with a blanket draped over it.  What would you do?  Don’t stop…

Call 911 as soon as you can to report this because….

There are gang initiations that have been reported such as leaving car seats by the road..with a fake baby in it..waiting for someone to check on it.  This is usually beside a wooded/grassy area where the person can be dragged into the woods or other and beaten/robbed/rapped. 

If you are driving at night and eggs are thrown at your windshield..DO NOT USE YOUR WIPERS OR WATER..it turns the eggs milky and then you can’t see..you stop the care and become a victim of the thieves/gang.

Stay safe and happy and read more of my important posts!

Until next time,

Shannon

CPR training Minnesota

Tuesday, March 30th, 2010

How many sites have you tried so far??

You certainly don’t need to look any further!  We are the leader in Instructor based learning, you get a person to talk with, questions get answered and all in a comfortable, professional atmosphere.  Are you tired of sitting through a video and an instructor that has NEVER done CPR?  We make it short, sweet and to the point, your visit with us will be professional and bring a sigh of relief after all those trainings that brought you a headache AND you WILL learn something new, we can guarantee it!

American CPR & Safety students are raving about our style, humor and the way we can put the information out there to all our students to make that vital information stick!

www.MinnesotaCPRtraining.com is the leader in training that is user friendly with our CPR, AED, first aid and OSHA classes being taught by instructor trainers with years of experience.  We offer low cost First Responder training that fits our busy student’s budgets, the training is certified through the EMSRB of the state of Minnesota.  We also offercompetitively priced OSHA certification training.  What more can you ask for? Do you need Blood Borne Pathogens training?  We have that also! It’s easy to contact us, just e-mail us at classes@americancprandsafety.com or call 763-477-5766!

In our last public training I received a comment from a Healthcare Provider CPR student: “I’ve taken these healthcare provider CPR classes for years, this is the first class that has given me insight to what we can do to help the alert cardiac victim, and, not just book information either! That’s what I pay for! This is a typical comment we receive time after time.  Comments such as this one gives us affirmation that we are giving all our students what they need AND what they want out of their training.

Our Wilderness First Aid Training helps scouts, adventurers and travelers with indepth training.  Are you looking for your group or troop to be trained before summer camp?  Call us,  you won’t be disappointed!

Our instructors and staff are constantly utilizing the web for OSHA updates and other Healthcare articles to find the newest and most update information to help our students stay abreast of new technology and medical news.

Our Pediatric CPR and First aid training is taught by our American Heart Association and National Safety Council trainers that have first hand knowledge of children and what to expect from those little ones, because they are experienced parents themselves!  Our  Day Care facilities and Montessori schools get the learning experience of a life time!  We are a complete training facility.  We don’t just brush the top.  Take our Pediatric CPR course and find out just what we mean. E-mail us at classes@americancprandsafety.com or call Shannon at 763-477-5766.

Are you looking for Adult CPR with AED training?  We’ve got it. It’s called Heartsaver/AED.  With this training, you can take just Adult, adult/child or include Infant training as well.  It’s fast, geared to your particular employment needs and you get your certification card at the time of training!

Some companies mail your card, so you have to wait.  Others do not include any materials in their cost !  You take the class…..we give you your training materials and card at class time!  Now that’s a complete package training.

Would you like to take our Family & Freinds CPR?  Just give us a call, we can set up an appointment in your home or our site, get at least 5 of your family members and freinds together and have a blast with our training, it’s fun, comfortable and very informative.  It’s simple to learn, all it takes is 2 1/2 hours of your time to learn how to help our 911 system save a family member or freinds’ life!

Click on our class schedule button for our individual training schedule.

For corporate training please  E-mail Shannon or call!  We fit your schedule, not the other way around.

Come on in, get comfortable and have a great experience.

See you in class,

Shannon Madden

Will you be the next statistic due to a mistake in safety awareness?

Tuesday, October 27th, 2009

Listen to yourself, there was a small reminder that told you to buckle up, oops, its gone, just like that!  You can forget because of multitasking, late to an appointment or thinking I’m just going to the store.  I don’t need to buckle up.  This is all it takes and your the next statistic. 

Listen to our message on BOB 106.1FM www.dothebob.com in the first week of November. Times are Monday from 10 AM-3 PM, Wed. 3 PM -7 PM and again on Fri. 10 AM-3 PM. If you like this message, please let us know by posting a comment to our post.

This message is in memory of Jennifer O’Connor who made an error of not buckling up and died because of this mistake.  

 I’ve been to many an accident as a firefighter responder and have seen what a seat belt can do for a person.  I have also seen the results of NOT wearing one.  I just never thought it would directly impact my family and myself.  You see, Jennifer was the mom of my 7 and 8 yr. old granddaughters. 

The message is presented to you by our safety team and BOB 106.1 FM.  Because American CPR & Safety, Inc. is committed to educating the public in safety issues, we’ve partnered with several industries to get messages of safety out there to the public. 

I’d like to know your feelings on this, what would you like to see brought to the public regarding safety issues?  Did you experience something that educated you in safety?  Do you have some helpful hints for our readers, please post your comment.  I will be more than happy to put it up on site to share!

October Newsletter, Bloodborne Pathogens!

Wednesday, September 30th, 2009
Protecting employees from bloodborne pathogen hazards in the workplace can be a lot of responsibility. To carry out your duty effectively, there’s a lot you need to know about BBPs.
Bloodborne pathogens (BBPs) are defined by OSHA as microorganisms present in human blood that can cause disease. The three primary pathogens found in the workplace are human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV; the hepatitis B, or HBV, virus; and the hepatitis C, or HCV, virus.Transmission HazardsIn order for transmission of pathogens to occur, the contaminated blood or bodily fluid must make direct contact with your blood. In the work environment, this is most likely to occur in one of three ways:

  • Cuts from contaminated sharp objects or needles, which is the most common form of transmission. Essentially, the contaminated blood or bodily fluid is being injected into the bloodstream through the cut. Examples of sharp objects in a manufacturing environment that could be contaminated include broken glass, a utility knife blade, or the edge of a sheet of metal to name a few.
  • Broken skin, including rashes or abrasions, don’t forget those small splits in the nail cuticle!  These areas becomes a point of transmission if an infected object makes contact with it.
  • Mucous membranes of the eyes, mouth, and nose, which could occur, for example, if blood splashed in the eyes or if an employee with another’s blood on his hand wiped his nose or mouth.

Routes of Exposure

“Routes of exposure” means the different ways employees might be exposed to bloodborne pathogens in the workplace. Any of the following could be a route of exposure on the job:

  • Contact with a co-worker who suffers a bleeding injury, such as a cut, abrasion, or amputation
  • Contact with blood while administering first aid, such as when applying pressure to a wound or wrapping an injury
  • Touching a contaminated surface, such as a table, tool, or control panel, that has been contacted with infected blood
  • Being assigned to clean up blood or bodily fluids after an injury
  • Contact with contaminated products or equipment in restrooms
  • Using a tool covered in dried blood

Exposure Prevention

The best way for employees to avoid contact with BBPs is to:

  • Treat all blood and bodily fluids as if they are infectious for HIV, hepatitis, or other bloodborne pathogens (“universal precautions”).
  • Use barrier protection—gloves, masks, aprons, protective eyewear—to avoid contact with bodily fluids. Avoiding direct contact means there is no exposure.
  • Immediately clean up and decontaminate surfaces and equipment that have been in contact with blood or bodily fluids.
  • Decontaminate skin by washing hands after handling any type of bodily fluid, even if you have worn gloves.
  • Immediately and properly dispose of contaminated items and materials used to disinfect contaminated items.

Questions to ask yourself: 

Do you know how long HBV lives on a surface?  What do I do when I remove my gloves?  Where do I put the bloody/fluid contained items?  Who do I call when I might have been exposed?  

Don’t know the answers??  Take our course!  Ask for Blood Borne Pathogens training for your employees or yourself NOW!!

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